Review: The Whirlwind In The Thorn Tree by SA Hunt (2013)

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Kindle Edition, 490 pages
Published February 22nd 2013 by Madman Press (first published February 21st 2013)

The Whirlwind In The Thorn Tree has been kicking around my ‘to read’ list for quite a while. I learned of the book, and it’s author, largely on r/fantasy, where he tirelessly promoted it, and it garnered quite a few recommendations from others. I’d actually bought the ebook while it was on sale, but opted to pick up the self-produced audio edition for easier listening. In general, the book came fairly highly acclaimed from many readers, though some folks I trust weren’t particularly high.

Unfortunately, it didn’t always work for me. Whirlwind is, essentially, an 80’s-style portal fantasy, through and through. Kid goes through random modern day life things, kid discovers object (in this case, a mirror – original) is a portal to another world he never knew existed, and gets wrapped up in the events happening in aforementioned world. Stop me if you’ve heard this one…namely like, a billion times. However, in a genre like fantasy, I’m not overly quick to begrudge folks for a bit of “been there, done that“, being as there’s only so many ideas to go with, and after a while everything gets a bit incestuous.

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However, Whirlwind isn’t a particularly good portal fantasy, in my opinion. Hunt’s writing is, at times, quite enjoyable – engaging, economical, and free flowing. However, he at times suffers from the trap which many self-pub authors find themselves locked in – over exposition. Sentence after sentence of adjectives and metaphors, in an effort to sound sophisticated or talented as a writer. In my opinion, Hunt’s writing, when it’s not in this trap, is good enough that he doesn’t need the over-writing in areas, but it comes and goes in cycles, with a paragraph you have to trudge through that is completely unnecessary.

The actual world created is pretty interesting, and I enjoy the concept of author-writing-what-he-experiences-in-alternate-world, however everything is just a bit too convenient, almost lazy. Everyone in the alternate world all but immediately accept Ross and his friends as allies, believing their outlandish story with very little prodding. Ross and co, for their part, seem to take to this much much less futuristic world very easily, not struggling at all without their modern amenities, and adapting to everything with very little issue. It all felt too..easy. It left me saying to myself “…really?” quite often.

Overall, the novel was not bad, I just found nothing really original here, and periods of dodgy writing that could have used a bit more polishing up. I can tell that Hunt has talent, has some vision of where he wants this book and his writing to go, but the pieces aren’t all put together here. I can totally understand why some people would love this and immediately engage in it, however for me, I’ve just read this same thing too many times, and done with better execution, to really give it a big endorsement.

Rating: 2 / 5

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